The hot mess of modern JavaScript

Published on Nov 17, 2020

I'm no stranger to JavaScript. I used to write it quite a lot 15-20 years ago. I even wrote couple of frameworks for it. So it shouldn't be that hard for me to work with it after all these years. (I have done some occasional JavaScript coding during the meantime too.)

The language itself isn't the problem. Even if there has been a couple of major iterations of it that came out since my prime time. It's just syntactic sugar, easy enough to pick up rather fast. In many ways it's a lot easier to do things just by the vanilla JavaScript itself than it used to be.

The problem is the ecosystem. The wild west of frameworks and tooling that is available today. While there is only a couple of serious frameworks their different versions and further systems build on them makes the thing complex. I mean, it's ok if you just pick one and stick with it. They are well designed systems that bring everything together in an easy package. You just stick with it and build with what's available on your chosen garden.

But JavaScript and web for me has always been about the freedom of mix and match all the best pieces together. To combine readymade solutions from here and there. These tools, that might make your life easy when focusing on just them can make the development a nightmare if you just wanted to combine two things from the different camps. And those doesn't even need to be from different frameworks: just a slight difference in the underlying library versions could make those pieces incompatible.